News

Rotary’s steaming success

by
June 14, 2017

Clydesdales at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Barry Thomas pours petrol into his McCormick-Deering engine at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

A blacksmith works int he shadows at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Caitlin and Amy Nanscawen at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

A model steam train at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Gary Rothenberg competes in the wood chopping at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Kris Brown competes in the wood chopping at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

A bag pipe player at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Anne Bradley and Dawn Minchin at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

Nathan Salter works on a National hot air fan at the Steam Rally Echuca Moama 2017. Photo by Luke Hemer.

ECHUCA-MOAMA might be known for the river and paddlesteamers but for the thousands who packed Rotary Park at the weekend they never rated a second glance.

Instead they were enthralled by a fantastic event, pulled together by an army of volunteers, and for which the crowds – and exhibitors – had come from far and wide.

And in every shape and size.

From the resident miniature railroad to the most minute working steam engines – there was even a steam powered lawn mower (not working at the time) – but all of them were dwarfed by some of the steam age’s leviathans.

Giant tractors with massive steel wheels, huge engines and, of course, Clydesdales, those spectacularly beautiful giants of the agrarian era.

With their delightfully feathered feet, teams of them stood proudly before leaning into their harnesses and heaving massive logs on drays with wooden wheels.

Or hoisting bales, showing wide-eyed children how things took place in the good old days.

You could check out the blacksmith (with kettle on the smouldering forge), watch the sweaty power of the axemen at the wood chop or ogle the oval full of vintage and/or collectible cars, sparkling in two days of beautiful weather turned on for the occasion.

Or just drop in at the soup and damper stall and juggle a piping hot damper, butter running down your arms. Unless you preferred the fresh baked (you could see it taking place) scones and jam and cream.

But most took their time and tried everything.

Rotary take a bow. It was a stunning set-up, clearly a massive drawcard and a stunning success.

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