News

Helping families meet a Challenge of life with cancer

by
October 02, 2017

AFTER a cancer diagnosis Challenge says most children have trouble understanding what is happening to their bodies and can find the treatment process emotionally and physically draining.

AFTER a cancer diagnosis Challenge says most children have trouble understanding what is happening to their bodies and can find the treatment process emotionally and physically draining.

The experience also has an overwhelming impact on everyone associated with that child.

If you have a child aged 18, or younger, who has been diagnosed with cancer or a life threatening blood disorder, you and your family are urged to get in contact with the organisation and become Challenge members (see contact details below).

Siblings and parents are equally considered members, as Challenge is about the entire family.

“Our promise is to deliver practical, personalised services of exceptional quality to ensure that children and families living with cancer are well supported throughout their cancer journey,” the spokesman said.

“Challenge is the only cancer support agency that provides more than 300 young people and their families vital support services in and out of hospital every week,” he said.

“A cancer diagnosis affects the entire family. Challenge activities unite families and allow them to spend time together, even when times are tough.

“Children and families are offered support from the moment they are diagnosed. Through every day of their cancer journey, we are there.

“Childhood illness does not discriminate along racial or religious lines.

“Challenge’s personalised approach to meeting the needs of children and their families allows us to take cultural and religious sensitivities into account. This is important in our increasingly diverse society.”

Challenge also has a team of ambassadors on board, including:

Robert Allenby, international golfer – “My passion to help sick children started as a 13-year-old when I lost a good family friend to cancer. I still remember clearly the feelings of sadness and confusion. Thinking back to that time, all I wanted to do was help my friend and his family”.

Nathan Buckley, Collingwood coach – “It is always an honour to be held up as a role-model and it is an honour which I take very seriously; in the sporting realm or with my own children. So it was with great pride that I accepted the invitation to be the Patron of Challenge to help support this organisation and its fundamental goal of bringing happiness to the lives of children and families living with cancer”.

Andy Lee, media personality – “I am delighted to be involved with Challenge and to see the outstanding work they continue to do with kids and their families. It is a humbling experience to have the opportunity to be a part of the organisation and in particular to visit the kids in hospital and see what a difference Challenge makes to the families through the many services and programs they provide – it is also a fairly good opportunity to play video games throughout a morning and not appear lazy.

Kylie Minogue – “My relationship with Challenge started in the early ’90s. I was touched not only by their hard work, but also the heart in their endeavour to raise awareness of cancer and to raise much-needed funds for Challenge. I loved meeting these beautiful children and their families; listening to them and helping where I could. Over two decades later, and having experienced life with the illness myself, my involvement with Challenge and my interactions with the children and their families continue to be an inspiration to me”.

■Contact details:

Challenge Family Centre

529-535, King Street

West Melbourne Victoria 3003

Phone (03) 9329 8474 or email [email protected]

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