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Funding to tackle family violence in Aboriginal homes

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January 12, 2018

KYABRAM and District Health Service is set to benefit from state government funding to help combat family violence in Aboriginal communities.

KYABRAM and District Health Service is set to benefit from state government funding to help combat family violence in Aboriginal communities.

As part of the 2017-18 Indigenous Family Violence Strategy Community Initiatives Fund, northern Victorian organisations are sharing in more than $200,000 worth of funding.

The state government is providing $650,000 in funding for 45 projects across the state that reduce, prevent and respond to family violence in Aboriginal communities.

“Kyabram District Health Service as the auspice agency is very pleased to be able to support the Loddon Campaspe Indigenous Family Violence Action Group in their initiatives to address the prevalence of family violence in our local indigenous communities,” Peter Abraham, KDHS chief executive said.

“Programs which bring the community together, such as Blast Camp and cultural gathering events will better empower local communities to take preventative approaches to the prevention of family violence.

“We plan to be utilising the funding this year to support these programs.”

The government is implementing all 227 recommendations of the Royal Commission into Family Violence and delivering a 10-year plan to end family violence for all Victorians, including Aboriginal children and families.

The plan includes working in partnership with Aboriginal communities, increased funding for Aboriginal Child Specialist Advice and Support Services, and the establishment of a network of Support and Safety Hubs across Victoria.

The launch of these projects coincided with the Victoria Against Violence campaign, which is a key part of the UN’s orange-themed UNiTE to End Violence Against Women campaign which ran from November 25 to December 10, International Human Rights Day.

Member for Northern Victoria Jaclyn Symes said: “Breaking the cycle of Aboriginal family violence must involve local responses led by Aboriginal communities.

“Aboriginal people are at a significantly higher risk of experiencing family violence and less likely to report it, which is why these projects are so important.

“These projects will help create a safer Victoria for all Aboriginal children and families.”

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